I received a claim in an Estate. What do I do now?

If you are the executor or the personal representative of an estate, chances are you received a claim in the mail for the decedent. Most likely, it is an unpaid credit card bill. That bill has now been forwarded to collections and they are asking you, the next of kin, to personally pay it. Rest assured: You are not personally liable to pay this debt; however, the estate might be liable. Generally, creditor claims have priority over heirs, but they must be filed within certain deadlines. If it is a known creditor, that deadline to file a claim is generally one year from date of death. If you want to shorten this, give the known creditor notice. They have sixty days to file a claim or until the published notice deadline, whichever is later, or the claim is barred. If it is an unknown creditor and you publish a Notice of Creditors in the newspaper, the deadline to file is generally four months from the notice. This is considered the published notice deadline. That is why it takes at least six months to open and close an estate: You want the creditor period to expire first. You pay heirs before creditor, you open yourself up to personal liability. After the deadline has passed, the claim is barred and forever extinguished. The personal representative actually does not have the authority to pay a barred claim.

If the claim is valid or court-ordered to pay and if you have more than one, you must pay claims in the following priority. (1) Property held by or in the possession of the deceased person as fiduciary or trustee of a trust; (2) administrative costs and expenses to administer the estate or trust; (3) funeral expenses; (4) federal taxes; (5) medical expenses of last illness of decedent; (6) state taxes; (7) Medicaid; (8) child support obligations; and (9) all other claims. This is not word-for-word; I am paraphrasing the statute. For a more complete citation, look at the Colorado Revised Statutes Section  15-12-805. You can review them here.

As an example, if the estate has $100, and you receive a claim for $200 from Medicaid but you also have a funeral bill for $400, pay the funeral bill first and give notice to Medicaid why they are not receiving any funds.

If you do not think the claim is valid, disallow it. The creditor has sixty (60) days to file a petition for allowance and set a hearing for the claim or it is barred.

If you need assistance with a claim or general administration of an estate, please call the Grand Junction Estate Attorneys at Reams & Reams: 970-242-7847.