Estate Taxes? “Rolling in the Deep”

Administering an estate or trust? Were taxes filed before the person died? How would you know? The IRS allows access to previously filed returns with authority. An unpaid income tax bill is common. Hopefully, there is a recorded lien to alert you. But some go unnoticed. This problem occurs at every income scale. As a recent example, review the Estate of Aretha Franklin.

Ms. Franklin died August 16, 2018 from pancreatic cancer. She was a prolific singer and songwriter. She was inducted into the Rock and Rock Hall of Fame. Her estate may be worth over $80 million (which might trigger “estate tax” problems). But she neglected to pay her income taxes for years.

The IRS filed an additional Proof of Claim for more than $1.5 million for tax years dating back as far as 2010 for 945 taxes and related penalties.


Irs Seeks To Recover Millions In Unpaid Taxes From The Estate Of Aretha Franklin
Kelly Erb – https://www.forbes.com/sites/kellyphillipserb/2018/12/28/irs-seeks-to-recover-millions-in-unpaid-taxes-from-the-estate-of-aretha-franklin/#5e5003715f9c

Ms. Franklin forgot or neglected to file. Now, it is the executor’s problem. The IRS is a creditor of the estate. Any unpaid tax will be a liability. It is the fiduciary’s job to negotiate or satisfy these claims.

Some people confuse “estate tax” with income tax in an estate. The federal “estate tax” might affect the estate if the combined assets of the decedent or trust are over $11.18 million (2018). See IRS’s reference to the Estate Tax. Aretha Franklin will have that problem, but the majority of Americans should never worry about it.

However, if the estate generates income above a certain amount, such as capital gains or dividends, the fiduciary will have to file an estate return for that income. See IRS’s reference to the Income Tax Return for Estates and Trusts. Of course, these are general considerations. The are exceptions to these rules. There are also pitfalls and penalties if you do not file on time. Do not be a link in the IRS’s “Chain of Fools,” as Ms. Franklin would belt. Retain an accountant to advise on any taxable event or liability before you close the estate or trust (even better: hire them immediately when you start acting as a fiduciary).

If you need advise on how to properly administer an estate or trust, please contact the Estate Attorneys of Grand Junction, Reams & Reams at 970-242-7847.